Use these standards best-practices to achieve more powerful links in terms of SEO

Phrase elements: EM, STRONG, DFN, CODE, SAMP, KBD, VAR, CITE, ABBR, and ACRONYM

The ABBR and ACRONYM elements allow authors to clearly indicate occurrences of abbreviations and acronyms. Western languages make extensive use of acronyms such as "GmbH", "NATO", and "F.B.I.", as well as abbreviations like "M.", "Inc.", "et al.", "etc.". Both Chinese and Japanese use analogous abbreviation mechanisms, wherein a long name is referred to subsequently with a subset of the Han characters from the original occurrence. Marking up these constructs provides useful information to user agents and tools such as spell checkers, speech synthesizers, translation systems and search-engine indexers. The content of the ABBR and ACRONYM elements specifies the abbreviated expression itself, as it would normally appear in running text. The title attribute of these elements may be used to provide the full or expanded form of the expression.
EM
Indicates emphasis.
STRONG
Indicates stronger emphasis.
CITE
Contains a citation or a reference to other sources.
DFN
Indicates that this is the defining instance of the enclosed term.
CODE
Designates a fragment of computer code.
SAMP
Designates sample output from programs, scripts, etc.
KBD
Indicates text to be entered by the user.
VAR
Indicates an instance of a variable or program argument.
ABBR
Indicates an abbreviated form (e.g., WWW, HTTP, URI, Mass., etc.).
ACRONYM
Indicates an acronym (e.g., WAC, radar, etc.).

Quotations: The blockquote and q elements

Blockquote example

<blockquote cite="http://www.askapache.com/2006/htaccess/htaccesselite-ultimate-htaccess-article/">
<p>I tried to keep them extremely minimalistic and to the point. The focus here is not to explain Apache .htaccess or httpd.conf, this is a list of best-practice .htaccess code snippets for specific functions.</p>
</blockquote>

Q example

askApache said, <q lang="en-us">Be sure and check out the comprehensive example htaccess file</q>

Subscripts and superscripts: the SUB and SUP elements

Read more at W3.org

http://www.456bereastreet.com/archive/200412/the_alt_and_title_attributes/

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